The Long Tail – Its impact on grad recruitment

The Long Tail, as in use by the book of Chris ...
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I have recently been reading The Long Tail by Chris Anderson. The concept is quite clear, especially from a retail point of view, but we can see the ‘long tail’ appearing in pretty much every single situation you care to think of. Which Anderson acknowledges in his penultimate chapter. This got me thinking in terms of whether or not the long tail could be seen in graduate recruitment, and what impact it is having or could have in the future.

So does the long tail appear within graduate recruitment? I would say it does, when looked at from a ‘number of jobs vs. ranking of jobs offered high-to-low’ point of view. I think we can say fairly definitely that a few of the largest graduate recruiters (i.e. the Big 4 accounting firms), I can only talk about the UK, will have the largest number of vacancies right down to the SMEs that take on one or two graduates. Although, sadly,  I can’t find any freely available data to back that up. (anyone have that so I can make a pretty graph??)

What impact could the long tail ‘idea’ have on grad recruitment in the future? Something that Anderson talks about in his book is the increasing liklihood that someone’s individual tastes are catered for (in music for example). I think that in a few years time, and maybe we are beginning to see it already, graduates will increasingly want a graduate job that meets their particular needs. Maybe recruiters will have to start offering an massively expanded range of roles to satisfy all of the different niches. I can’t see recruiters liking that idea though!! What I have noticed is the increasingly common rotational placement-based graduate schemes, whereby a graduate moves to a new role every 6-12 months. This is something I particularly looked for when I was applying to grad roles last year.

I see it offering benefits to both the employer and the graduate. The employer gets a broader range of people interested in its programme, more choice of candidates. They also give the graduate experience of a wider range of roles which could be important a few years down the line when they are called upon to manage a section which they otherwise might not have had any knowledge of. For the graduate, they get to pick and choose the roles that interest them most.

I think most graduate schemes should take on this sort of rotational placement-style programme; with the exception of schemes in Audit where there isn’t much scope for variety except within types of clients. I see it being mutually beneficial for all parties and will , I believe, ensure that their programmes are relevant to and satisfy the needs of a wider range of people, leading to a greater candidate base to choose the best from.

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2 Responses to “The Long Tail – Its impact on grad recruitment”

  1. Recruitment Risk Reduction Tips « John Dierckx Says:

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  2. Become self-employed Says:

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    […]The Long Tail – Its impact on grad recruitment « Richard Thinks…[…]…

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